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This Old Crack House

From log house to farmhouse. Farmhouse to townhouse. Townhouse to apartment house. Apartment house to crack house. Crack house to our house. Our house to our home.

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Tuesday, July 19, 2016

More Roofing Antics (a little late)

It seems that is is raining just about every two days so far this year. This is a problem when you are trying to tear off a roof that has 4 layers of shingle over the original cedar shakes that were put on in 1900. It takes forever because I need to preserve the shake layer as best I can in order to install metal roofing over it. This saves me from having to haul 8' X 4' sheets of plywood onto my roof which weigh far more than the 17' X 3' sheets of metal roofing!

The roof over the walk in attic has leaked ever since we bought the house and based on the damage to the bathroom ceiling, probably had for years. It would also appear that it had leaked in the same area many years before that. The end result being this hole below the gutter line where all the rotten wood shakes just crumbled as I tore of the overlying asphalt shingle.


From inside it looked like this! Culminating in a giant hole where the straps had rotted as well. There had been a previous repair done here.


Here is a view of the rest of the roof on this side of the house. Complete with tarp for the next installment of rain.


And here, in the eaves was where I found a whiskey bottle that was produced between 1905 and 1915. Since it post dates the original 1900 roof, it must have been someones secret stash or a place to hide a bottle that would be found over 100 years later. There was another bottle (you can see it in the photo sitting on the floor) stashed in the floor between the wall. It still contains some moldy liquid but has no dating marks and just has the 1 quart stamp on it. It was placed there after the rock wool insulation was installed.


This side of the attic roof is currently under tar paper. I am now forced to strip the section above this on the main part of the house in order to properly install the metal because there is a valley and a chimney at the junction of the two sections.


I don't know which I hate more, roofing or plumbing.
To be continued ......

1 Comments:

At 8/04/2016 10:54 PM, Blogger Pleasance Faast said...

This is absolutely amazing! I love that this house has such a rich history and that you have decided to take it on as your project. The roof alone must present a lot of challenges, as it usually does with older homes like this one. Plumbing is yet another one of the biggest challenges with these old houses. I hope it gets easier.

 

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