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This Old Crack House

From log house to farmhouse. Farmhouse to townhouse. Townhouse to apartment house. Apartment house to crack house. Crack house to our house. Our house to our home.

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Friday, January 12, 2007

A Nagging Question

"Gary, what do you use to fill holes, gouges, et al, since you refinish? Thanks! "

I use wood putty where I think it is needed. I use Bondo for large holes. For these doors I used wood putty from the container. After a couple of coats of amber shellac I painted over the light areas with a brown acrylic paint that was slightly darker than the wood was turning. Any paint that remained in dents got the paint treatment too. Basically I am trying to mask the light spots so that they don't draw the eye to them. I then applied another couple of coats of shellac and now the filled areas aren't that noticable.

Here are the finished doors;






Here is a close up of where the door knob hole was filled with Bondo. The hole was from a rim lock door knob and is above and right of the key hole which I am using for a thumb latch lock (which is what was used on this door in our house);



Here it is without the flash going off and how it looks in real light. The oxidation from the position of the rim lock looks worse than my repair. When the thumb latch lock is installed your eyes won't even notice the discoleration because the lock will draw the attention since it is unusual.



This is a close up of the two panel door to show how the finish is with a few dings and scrapes after shellac has been applied.



When you own a house that is this old you have to accept that the woodwork can never be perfect and will look some what distressed. My skill with a paint brush is the result of hobby related painting and so I am quite good at creating the illusion of a door that is in better condition than it really is! These doors are upstairs on the rustic side of the house and won't be seen by many people. Besides, I only know one person who will inspect doors and molding and notice the flaws on a room and that is me. I already know where the flaws are and I'm not talking!

6 Comments:

At 1/13/2007 11:42 PM, Blogger Ranty said...

Whoa!

Your blog is awesome!

I'm so pissed that I didn't think of this blog name first... it's the best!

 
At 1/13/2007 11:53 PM, Blogger kdogg said...

Thanks for the great post, Gary. Resurrecting 120+ year woodwork, doors especially, that's seen most its life in a rental is the definition of character. I'm staining my woodwork pretty dark to hide my flaws and such. Window trim can be the worst. With years of screws and nails holding up window dressing rods, I'm becoming a sculptor and pushing the limits of this wood filler. Keep up the excellent work and thanks for sharing.

 
At 1/13/2007 11:55 PM, Blogger kdogg said...

...and the doors look great. I think that's the first two-vertical-panel-door I have ever seen.

 
At 1/16/2007 4:51 PM, Blogger Kristin said...

Mmmm, so pretty!

 
At 1/16/2007 11:40 PM, Blogger kendra said...

Hi! Thanks so much for this post! It's exactly what I needed. (I went to a hobby store today to get the paint for touching up some filled spots on the trim I'm refinishing). :) I've been lurking on your blog for the past couple months-- and it's been a great source of help for getting started on our rennovations. We're new in town-- *waves from just across the U-Dayton campus* We have a much smaller project than you do, but I'm hoping to get my own blog going shortly.

 
At 10/30/2008 9:00 PM, Blogger Larry said...

Gary -

What type of wood are these doors?

Thanks!

 

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